Tiffany Press, Agent, New York Model Management

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'My name is Tiffany Press [@TiffanySquared], and I am a model agent for New York Model Management. Working with models has no doubt had an impact on the way I shop for and use products, however I find the most inspiration comes from the makeup artists, publicists, stylists, and producers who conjure up all the magic behind the scenes. Model management has been my career for the better part of a decade, so I’ve amassed an arsenal of creatives to count on as friends and counsel. There are models from the Netherlands, Ethiopia, China—pretty much any corner of the world—and their perspectives are the best part of the job. When I’m not working, I’m writing—a lot. When not working or writing, I’m probably on a big yellow bike SoulCycling, which has had a major impact on my beauty priorities. I’ll never be a low-maintenance girl, but staying active now outweighs keeping my hair and makeup sweat-free.

As a kid, I relied on two very definite beauty icons. Janet Jackson and Lisa Turtle from Saved By the Bell. Eventually I moved on to Sade, Iman, Yasmin Le Bon, Bianca Jagger, Cicely Tyson—a little more mature, I think. I had a very strong allegiance to a slicked back bun, hoop earrings, and a dramatically strong lip. Because makeup was definitely off the table as an option at that age, I started my relationship with beauty through fragrance. I used to bring magazine pullout fragrances to school. And when I turned 13, my mother bought me Exclamation by Coty. She bought it mostly to stop me from smelling like Estée Lauder Pleasures. Today, I like the idea of having a fragrance wardrobe. I collect the empty bottles because the smell lingers forever. Currently Balenciaga Paris, Serge Lutens' Nuit de Cellophane, and Tom Ford's White Patchouli are on rotation.

Skincare in my family was always simple but paramount. My mother and both grandmothers have freakishly youthful skin. I never used anything on my face aside from Noxzema Classic Clean Original Deep Cleansing Balm and Dove until I was 20. At 31, I still use them because they still work. When I don’t use Dove, I use Shea Moisture African Black Soap. My bathroom and kitchen are almost interchangeable with the volume of oils in my possession—castor oil being the most crucial for me. I use it in my hair as a pre-conditioner, on my skin as a makeup remover, on my cuticles, heels, and sometimes I mix it with lotion. I've recently gotten into Biologique Recherche products. Growing up and into my twenties with such a bare-bones approach to skincare made the idea of buying into a 'cult' luxury brand seem contrived and trendy. I took a sip of the Kool-Aid, and it was the best advice I’ve taken. I use the Lotion P50W 1970 for sensitive skin. I’ve never used a line of skincare that actually seems to change the look of my skin. I’m new to it, and it's a commitment, but it’s something I’m going to hang on to.

My makeup routine at the moment revolves around three core products. Laura Mercier's Tinted Moisturizer in Bronze Radiance or Laura Mercier's Foundation Primer in Radiance with a little Kevyn Aucoin Skin Enhancer in Sx12 where I need it. The jar and the heavy consistency can be a little intimidating at first, but it gives me more options than anything I’ve ever used. On the lips I’ll use either Kevyn Aucoin Expert Lip Color in Bloodroses or NARS Larger Than Life Lip Gloss in Rouge Tribal.

My hair needs three things—moisture, supplements, and space. Moisture in the form of Carol’s Daughter Black Vanilla Moisture & Shine Leave-In Conditioner, which is not too heavy and not too slick. I love hair serums but could no longer bear the feeling of a greasy hand when I touched my hair. I take supplements in the form of Viviscal and fish oils—not necessarily to grow it out but more as an added weapon against breakage. I’m a supplement junkie anyway, so this comes easily. I keep my hair short and wear it back often, so that I don’t have to poke at it daily. I let it breathe. My turn offs? Sulfates and heat. My flat iron and I broke up to save my relationship with my hair. And for washing, I go sulfate-free with Theorie or Shea Moisture for shampoo and conditioner. I trust any product in both lines.

Iman once said something along the lines of being intrigued by the phrase ‘she’s beautiful, like the girl next door,’ and she always wondered whose neighborhood they were talking about. It’s my favorite idea in beauty. We all have our stuff and these trite beauty categories will never fit every one. What's important to me is to find the thing I can pull off that most people can’t and make it my trademark. My gapped teeth and my obnoxious Alvin-chipmunk cheeks keep me inspired. To find your beauty niche, you need something kind of wrong that you only want to enhance—not alter.”

—as told to ITG

Tiffany was the winner of our #ITGTopShelfie Pinterest contest! Check out her glossy Pinboard here. The #ITGTopShelfie series puts the focus on the lives and beauty routines of Into The Gloss's lovely, accomplished, and loyal community of readers. Show us your own Top Shelfie on Instagram—tag us @intothegloss, and include the hashtag #ITGTopShelfie.