The Bachelorette: Anguilla

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replies

Dear ITG,

Last weekend I went to Anguilla for a bachelorette party. There were no strippers, phallic ornaments, or terribly bad behavior (this is not that kind of postcard, unfortunately). Instead, I found myself on an island with six girls and one bride-to-be—my friend Elizabeth.

For the past two springs, I've visited Antigua and am well aware of the mosquitoes that inhabit the Caribbean and the near impossibility of leaving without sunburn. This time, we only got the chance to spend 48 hours in Anguilla—and it took a plane, a car ride, a ferry ride, and another car ride to finally arrive at our hotel. But somehow, travel seems a little less excruciating when you're surrounded by the sound of waves. Then it's a little more escapist fantasy, rather than trudging through the heat with heavy luggage.

To that note, Elizabeth’s sister, Margot, gave us each a gift bag upon arrival—some little things to “combat' the small pains of island life (kidding). Of note:

Our hotel concierge welcomed us with a large frozen arm of aloe that looked sort of like the tail of an overgrown lizard. The mosquitoes were relentless and unavoidable, so Margot clipped a portable mosquito repellant fan onto her dress in the evenings.

As much as I enjoy Miss Lily’s in New York, it doesn’t rival food in Anguilla. Things like fresh fish, Jerk chicken, and—my favorite—cocktails made with with Jamaican Ting soda. There’s simplicity in the meals that reflect that greater culture of this island and the general Caribbean. The pace is slower and the sunsets are longer. I didn’t keep much track of time (but that's partially due to the fact that the battery in my watch died).

My experience with bachelorette parties is limited, but I can imagine this was a pretty successful. We arrived mostly strangers and quickly got to know each other. We traded skincare tips and what works against mosquito attacks (papaya seeds, apparently). We drank, laughed, and celebrated the joy we felt for our friend who would be entering “the next stage” of her life. For any soon-to-be brides planning a mellow bachelorette experience, look no further than the shores of Anguilla.

xConnie

Connie Tsang is a freelance writer, producer, and creative consultant. Currently, she is the Managing Editor of Industrie Magazine. Photos courtesy of the author. Read her last postcard from Cartagena here.

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