Follow
Glossier pink

Marc Jacobs Fall 2012

Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
1
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
2
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
3
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
4
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
5
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
6
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
7
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
8
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
Marc Jacobs Fall 2012
replies

Guido (Redken): You know, sometimes it’s not about the hair…this time it’s about the hats, which are amazing—the total silhouette is amazing—so mine is the supporting part today. This character is not to be seen without her hat. There are a few tendrils that are going to be brushing across the face as the girls move, and I’m making these little knots in the back that will just support the hats that Stephen Jones and Marc designed together. My wisps are very important to me [laughs]; they’re not a huge statement. What’s amazing about Marc is that he wants the inside to be just as amazing as the outside, so it’s not just a knot that’s pulled away—they’re two ponytails, braided and pinned up, a bit Björk-ish. The girls feel magical…not fairy-tale, because I think they’re more sophisticated than that—they’re women—but they are eccentric. They have their own state of mind. She is very done, from top to toe; everything is thought out and considered, and she’s created herself very well. So it’s not really a hairstyle…I think this is a fashion extravaganza. And Marc, like no one else, can create that fantasy. I think sometimes fashion shows are for dreaming, and they are to get lost in, and they don’t always need to be about ‘runway to reality’. It’s a beautiful fantasy and a beautiful message to send to women.

Francois Nars (NARS): We came up with very romantic makeup, a little bit decadent look, with a smoky, round eye, inspired a little bit by the 1920’s and 1930’s. We wanted to modernize it so we decided no lip. It’s very pale skin with no blush. I thought it would be nice to make the girls a bit dreamy and mysterious, and very monochromatic. We got inspired by the Marchesa Casati, who had a very very dramatic look, a very dark, extreme look. We kept the eyebrows very sharp, very strong—but not aggressive, not too black like in that 1970’s Comme des Garçons way, but more like these could be the natural eyebrows of the girls, if they had dark eyebrows. We’re using black eye shadow underneath the eyes, because it looks a bit more decadent and a little strange. It’s always nice to bring some strangeness. [Laughs] When I think of makeup I think of it almost like a painter, all the lights and darks, and I think this makeup is very black and white, in a way. She could be a strange, dramatic heroine on a train, like in the 1920’s….she looks like there is some emotion; it’s not just a blank face. I think silent movies are in the back of my mind, always. And at the last moment we’ll add some shine, so that on the runway it will almost look like they have gloss on their cheeks, just to give some freshness to the look.