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Rochas Spring 2013

Rochas Spring 2013
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Rochas Spring 2013
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Rochas Spring 2013
Rochas Spring 2013
Rochas Spring 2013
Rochas Spring 2013
Rochas Spring 2013
Rochas Spring 2013
Rochas Spring 2013
Rochas Spring 2013
Rochas Spring 2013
Rochas Spring 2013
Rochas Spring 2013
Rochas Spring 2013
Rochas Spring 2013
Rochas Spring 2013
Rochas Spring 2013
Rochas Spring 2013
Rochas Spring 2013
Rochas Spring 2013
Rochas Spring 2013
Rochas Spring 2013
Rochas Spring 2013
Rochas Spring 2013
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Lucia Pieroni (Clé de Peau): The look we’re doing today is gorgeous porcelain dolls with amazing, really matte, strong lipstick. In a strange, weird way, they’re kind of like California girls that never go in the sun. They’re very pale, very beautiful. The skin is super natural, with a little bit of highlight on the eyelid—using three gold colors from the new Spring quad—and then the new highlighting palette across the cheek. You don’t really see much of the eye with the amazing scarves in the show, so we just did highlights to make them sparkle a bit, so when you do see someone’s eye, it kind of pops out.

For the lips, we’re using a mixture of two Clé de Peau lipstick colors together. With a brush, we applied a layer of the deeper R1shade, and then added some of the R2in the middle of the lips, just to make it pop. And then we’re putting a little bit of pink cheek blush over the top, to matte it all out, fading out at the edges with a cotton bud. [Ed. note : For the blush, we recommend trying MAC's pigment powder in Magenta Madness.] The powder blush gives the lips more depth; it creates a more beet-root color—like a rose, really. You know how roses are really velvety? When you add powder to lipstick, it makes it really velvety, and you get different depths and dimensions—you get a little bit more of the pink, and then a little of the darker beet-root color, and the powder blurs out the edges, so there’s no real strong edge to it; it’s almost 3-D.

Eugene Souleiman : I love straight hair at the moment. For me, it’s almost this exercise of, 'How can I make straight hair not look like boring straight hair?' The same thing with a ponytail, which is something every woman does at some point in their life. How do you make it not boring?

This is quite an interesting and inspiring collection—inspiring in the sense that it’s very quiet and there are these incredible details. It’s so normal [that] it’s fantastical—if that makes any sense. Everything’s based on the idea of a capsule collection of what a woman would have in her wardrobe: a tennis skirt, a polo shirt, a jacket, a pair of trousers, a skirt, a dress. It’s very basic in that sense, but the volumes and the ways the pieces have been twisted in this subtle way—the rose prints are really sumptuous, but they’ve been done digitally and they’re kind of blurred. Everything’s off, and that’s really what I wanted to do with the hair. Because there were these huge satin scarves that almost look like cloches, with huge silk flowers, there wasn’t a huge area I had to work with. So, I decided to make it all about texture and quality of hair and lines. I looked at the clothes and I thought it would be amazing if there was hair coming down the back—a kind of sensual, romantic veil of hair that almost floats. Then I thought, ‘Wouldn’t it be nice if I put the hair in a ponytail?’ And I went, ‘Nah, it wouldn’t be nice, it would be bloody boring.’ So what we’ve done is straightened the hair so that it’s so shiny, it almost looks synthetic, and we put it in a very low ponytail and literally pulled the hair apart, so there are curtains of hair that disappear up, and then some straight pieces of hair in front. You’re not really looking for something specific when you see the girls’ hair, it’s sensory— you look at it and you feel something, because you’re looking at textures that are so perfect, they’re almost unreal. There’s no products, either—that’s what’s so great about it. We just used a flat iron and some Wella Ocean Spritz in the front to create that texture.

—as told to ITG

A quick shout-out to the new (ish) girl who caught our eye backstage: icy blonde Juliana Schurig (Ford) [photos 1 and 2, above], who we were SHOCKED to discover is American—hailing from New Jersey, no less. “I’m German, Italian, Norwegian, Czech…I’m the true definition of the 'American melting pot,'” the 18-year-old laughed. “My hair is also bleached now—they bleached it for Alex Wang, and they did my eyebrows, too—which kind of gives me an edge I think…I’ve been modeling for four years, but this is my first season [doing shows]. I wasn't modeling full-time because I was finishing high school, but I just graduated. So, I just went to London and Milan with my mom, and I’m here in Paris by myself. It’s exciting.” You betcha.

Photographed by Emily Weiss at the Grand Palais in Paris on September 26th, 2012.

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